The Uncommon Leader Podcast

The Intersection of AI, Leadership, and Life with Mark Savant

January 23, 2024 John Gallagher Episode 99
The Intersection of AI, Leadership, and Life with Mark Savant
The Uncommon Leader Podcast
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The Uncommon Leader Podcast
The Intersection of AI, Leadership, and Life with Mark Savant
Jan 23, 2024 Episode 99
John Gallagher

Welcome, Uncommon Leaders, to Episode 99 of The Uncommon Leader Podcast, with Mark Savant.

Mark is revolutionizing the way we think about productivity and leadership with his embrace of AI, reporting a staggering 90% time savings that allowed him to quit his day job and pursue his passion. But beyond his personal success, Mark raises critical conversations on AI's impact on jobs, healthcare, and even the complexities of ethics in technology.

In today's illuminating conversation, we cover everything from the dangers of training AI with toxic data, to the value of authenticity and storytelling in leadership. Mark shares his best tech investments and his take on the very fabric that holds together the entrepreneurial journey – from the importance of pleasure in work to the endurance required to tackle the inevitable highs and lows.


Moreover, we'll hear Mark's favorites in the podcasting world, insights on the power of mastermind communities, and his advice on leveraging virtual assistants powered by AI.

As always, I encourage you to engage, share, and be part of our leadership journey as we tackle the multifaceted world of business, personal growth, and societal change. Hold on to your seats, leaders; this is an episode you surely won't want to miss!

WEBSITE: https://www.marksavantmedia.com/
PODCAST: http://www.afterhoursentrepreneur.com/
NEWSLETTER: aiupdate.ai
PUBLIC EMAIL: contact@marksavantmedia.com

Thanks for listening in to the Uncommon Leader Podcast. Please take just a minute to share this podcast with that someone you know that you thought of when you heard this episode. One of the most valuable things you can do is to rate the podcast and leave a review. You can do that on Apple podcasts, or rate the podcast on Spotify or any other platform you listen.

Did you know that many of the things that I discuss on the Uncommon Leader Podcast are subjects that I coach other leaders and organizations ? If you would be interested in having me discuss 1:1 or group coaching with you, or know someone who is looking to move from Underperforming to Uncommon in their business or life, I would love to chat with you. Click this link to set up a FREE CALL to discuss how coaching might benefit you and your team)

Until next time, Go and Grow Champions!!

Connect with me

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Welcome, Uncommon Leaders, to Episode 99 of The Uncommon Leader Podcast, with Mark Savant.

Mark is revolutionizing the way we think about productivity and leadership with his embrace of AI, reporting a staggering 90% time savings that allowed him to quit his day job and pursue his passion. But beyond his personal success, Mark raises critical conversations on AI's impact on jobs, healthcare, and even the complexities of ethics in technology.

In today's illuminating conversation, we cover everything from the dangers of training AI with toxic data, to the value of authenticity and storytelling in leadership. Mark shares his best tech investments and his take on the very fabric that holds together the entrepreneurial journey – from the importance of pleasure in work to the endurance required to tackle the inevitable highs and lows.


Moreover, we'll hear Mark's favorites in the podcasting world, insights on the power of mastermind communities, and his advice on leveraging virtual assistants powered by AI.

As always, I encourage you to engage, share, and be part of our leadership journey as we tackle the multifaceted world of business, personal growth, and societal change. Hold on to your seats, leaders; this is an episode you surely won't want to miss!

WEBSITE: https://www.marksavantmedia.com/
PODCAST: http://www.afterhoursentrepreneur.com/
NEWSLETTER: aiupdate.ai
PUBLIC EMAIL: contact@marksavantmedia.com

Thanks for listening in to the Uncommon Leader Podcast. Please take just a minute to share this podcast with that someone you know that you thought of when you heard this episode. One of the most valuable things you can do is to rate the podcast and leave a review. You can do that on Apple podcasts, or rate the podcast on Spotify or any other platform you listen.

Did you know that many of the things that I discuss on the Uncommon Leader Podcast are subjects that I coach other leaders and organizations ? If you would be interested in having me discuss 1:1 or group coaching with you, or know someone who is looking to move from Underperforming to Uncommon in their business or life, I would love to chat with you. Click this link to set up a FREE CALL to discuss how coaching might benefit you and your team)

Until next time, Go and Grow Champions!!

Connect with me

Speaker 1:

Hey, uncommon Leaders, welcome back. This is the Uncommon Leader podcast and I'm your host, john Gallagher. Today I've got an inspiring and equipping conversation with Mark Savant. Mark helps business owners launch and automate podcasts. His company, mark Savant Media, turns 30 minute zoom calls into an entire digital media presence. Mark is also the host of the globally ranked top 1% podcast, after hours entrepreneur, which is where I got a chance to learn about Mark, which highlights industry disruption such as AI, automation and independent media, and he's the host of a mastermind community focused on adapting and innovating with the newest AI technology. Tune in today, as we dive into the world of tech, exploring the future of AI, the power of mastermind groups and much, much more, mark brings to the table some compelling insights and personal anecdotes that will inspire and provoke your thinking and your daily leadership journey. You really don't want to miss this conversation. Let's get started. Mark Savant, welcome to the Uncommon Leader podcast. I appreciate you sharing your time with the listeners today. How are you doing?

Speaker 2:

I'm excellent honored to be here, john. Thanks for having me.

Speaker 1:

No, it's great to have you on. I'm looking forward to our conversation today and excited about some of the topics we're going to cover For the listeners. I followed Mark for a few years now on his social media channels and his podcast and things, so it's a great opportunity to have him on here and learn a little bit more just by getting a chance to have a one-on-one conversation with him. But, mark, I'll start you off just like I start every first time guest on the Uncommon Leader podcast, and that's with a question that's basically asking you to share a story from your childhood that still impacts who you are today, as a person, or as a leader, or as an entrepreneur.

Speaker 2:

So I think one of the most important lessons that I learned as a kid was that paying attention to who I am is really important. I've been an employee my whole life but I don't really have the mentality. I don't like to be held down. I don't like other people making decisions for me. When I was younger, I was a very good baseball player and I remember I just had one coach that I just didn't like, and one of the problems with team sports is you don't have a choice of whether you play or not. It's the coach's choice. And I was a really good player and the coach just wouldn't give me opportunities that I felt that I deserved and I honestly it kind of turned me off towards baseball as a whole. Right, which you could say regret, no regret, but that really turned me off. Had a similar experience in high school playing basketball. I felt that I was one of the better players on the team but I didn't get the chance to play because this other guy, because the coach said this guy is going to get the chance to play, and so it turned me off there. And then, even further, going into college, I was working at Best Buy and I actually really enjoyed working at Best Buy. It was a fun place to work.

Speaker 2:

But I didn't just want to be the bottom entry level employee, I wanted to move up in the company. I would have become an assistant manager, manager, and I remember going to the manager at the store and saying, hey, what should I do? I want to move up, I want to play a bigger role. I want to make more money. I want more influence. When I can do it, he said well, I want you to do these few things. I want you to join this fall in 10. I want you to join this volunteer club. I want you to show up for this event. I want to do this.

Speaker 2:

I did all the things we. I was part of initiatives in the store. I was just. I was doing all the things he asked me to do and then some everyone liked me. I played the politics game and when it came time to to hire for a supervisor position in the television department, I the home theater. I want to be in home theater. I know about TVs and know about DVD players, and it's back in the day when they had DVD players.

Speaker 2:

I knew about all the home stereo. I knew all the stuff. Everyone liked me, I had some um, I would say leadership qualities. But when it came time to hire for that position, not only did I not get hired, they went out and they hired someone from another store. There was a total doof. Total doof didn't get respect, and I was like you know, it was just really frustrated.

Speaker 2:

So after I graduated from college, I went into a job. I was looking for a job, not looking to build my own thing. And you know, I just turned 41. Age 40 was the first year that I was fully self-employed in my own podcast production agency marketing company. My first year I got to tell you, john, that was my, that was my favorite year. Age 40 was my favorite year, not 20, not 30, 40. And I think it's because I finally figured out my lane and I just wish I would have listened to my 12 year old self playing baseball and say hey, mark, you're not. You're not an employee, you're the. You want to be the boss, you want to be the leader, you want to make your own rules.

Speaker 1:

Mark that that is an awesome story and it kind of frames what I, what I've known about Mark Savanna has gone through. And yeah, I like the how you talked about. It's not the word regret. There's one of the one of my favorite books that's had an influence on me is the monkey sold his Ferrari. One of the first quotes in the book is when the student is ready, the teacher will arrive.

Speaker 1:

Okay, and you had to go through a lot of different experiences to recognize what you've been Now. You've been the after hours entrepreneur even before you were full time. You kind of had the side gig. As to what you're doing, from podcast production, doing some podcasting and some of the podcasts I've seen. They had the good dad show, I believe, was one of the podcasts that you hosted. You're now on YouTube and things like that.

Speaker 1:

But to be on your own like I've appreciated that as well First time for me, and so 53 was really fun for me, although I got I got a boot to help me get going there. I have so appreciated the freedom and I use that word a bunch that comes with the entrepreneurial style and having control of your own business, but there's also other, many other emotions that freedom comes with a price. Tell me about some of that price you had to pay, really in the past couple of years as well, or as you've been in essence on your own, and how you've gone through that journey and worked your way through it, cause it's not always roses and candy as an entrepreneur. There's ups and downs.

Speaker 2:

No, and, quite frankly, I think every day I I look at things and I'm like am I doing the right thing? Should I be doing that every day? And you know you mentioned, by the way, that you'd listen to my income report for 2023, the income reports have been my most popular episodes and I get the most feedback on them, because I just want to share the good, the bad and the ugly. Some months are great months and I'm happy. Some months are not so good and I'm not as happy. But I think to really give this a shot, to be your own boss, be an entrepreneur, you need to have that, that that type of personality, that mentality that some days are going to suck, some days are going to be great. You don't want to get too high, you don't want to get too low. You just want to kind of manage that emotional roller coaster that happens. And again, even, even still, every every day, I I get those feelings, but as far as the price that needs to be paid, I think that's the best as far as the price that needs to be paid. I'll give you an example this year on YouTube, on Mark Savant's YouTube channel, I hit one million views and I made YouTube partner, so YouTube is sending me checks to make videos. John, I had to record 800 videos to get there. I produced eight. I just want to repeat that for everyone back. I produced 800 YouTube videos before YouTube sent me a dollar Right, and most people aren't going to pay that price.

Speaker 2:

So I think what what that comes down to is finding something which, by the way, I could have done it way faster, knowing what I know now. But what we need to get on with ourselves with is is three things hey, what do I enjoy, what am I great at, and where is there a market demand? If you can put those three things together, I think that the the price that you need to pay becomes much more palatable, because if you're doing, if you don't have one of those three things, that that price is either going to be so painful that you can't keep up or people aren't just going, people are just thinking about it. So, getting those three things what do I enjoy, what am I good at? Where is the market? That's, those are the three things I think you want to hit as quickly as possible.

Speaker 1:

Mark, I appreciate that and I have this, this picture of circles, three circles overlapping right, and so where those three things overlap together is where you really hit your sweet spot. So we could play with basketball baseball analogies all over the place. As an entrepreneur, it's much like being a baseball player. You can be the best baseball player and get in the hall of fame and have a batting average of 300. So it fails seven out of 10 times and still make the hall of fame. And maybe even worse, you're going to do that a bunch as an entrepreneur, so you could have the mindset to say it's okay to fail. In fact, it's expected to fail.

Speaker 1:

The other side of that and because I've had a quote that I've heard that you know find something you love and you'll never work a day in your life. What I like to turn that around is that once you find something you love, you're good at it and there's a market for it, you'll work as many hours as you need to to make that happen because it feels right. So I appreciate you sharing that. I love those three things 100%.

Speaker 2:

I think it's. It's funny too, on that failure thing. You know, like Warren Buffett says, like I've only made five good trades my entire life right, the others were dogs, and I'm not going to go political here. But you could say a lot of bad things about Trump, a lot of things that he that you're reading you don't like and we're thinking he's done poorly. There's, I think, there's a lot to critique there. But when people attack him and say oh, he's had failed businesses, I'm like that's not a good attack. Everybody that's successful has had failures. You know so I and I got you know. That's a point that Tim Ferriss drives home in his book the Four Hour Workweek. You need to be comfortable with discomfort, and failure is the price that is necessary to see any sort of business success. It is. Everyone pays that price.

Speaker 1:

I appreciate you sharing that, mark. Mark, you also touched on your monthly income report. So you, you bear it all. You basically say what your expenses were, what your income were, and you put it out there on your podcast to communicate with others. Transparency as leaders is very important. I believe that's like the ultimate level of transparency. So you know, what is it that drove you to communicate that out, to be that transparent, and how would you advise leaders who are kind of nervous about, hey, should I say this or should I say that?

Speaker 2:

Well, my, my mom still is like, mark, I can't believe you're putting that out there. I would never. I would never. She's mortified that I'm putting out my income reports. But I mean, here's the deal. We live in a day and age where, you know, all you see on social media is and this is me in front of my Ferrari and here's me with my Photoshopped, filtered face and you know, people are hungry for for real. People are hungry for the realistic, especially as we go into an AI world, which we probably talk about. But you know, it struck me earlier last year, in 2023.

Speaker 2:

I think February I started doing the income report. I was like I remember seeing John Lee Dumas doing it on entrepreneurs on fire. I was like this is interesting. You know, I actually like the income report. He's not as transparent with all of his numbers as I am as far as breaking down every expense and exactly what went wrong and what went right. But you know, frankly, I don't see a lot of people doing that in on in the podcasting world. Most people that are doing entrepreneurship podcast are really just saying the good things that happened. But that's not. That's not real life. That's not real life in. You know. There's another, there's a couple goals there in that. Hey, once I did it I got a lot of response. I got more emails from that first income report than I ever gotten and I get more people that listen to that than any other episode, because it hits home, because it's real.

Speaker 2:

And you know, every entrepreneur, like we talked about, deals with failure, deals with struggles, and I think you know for me to say, oh, I didn't make any money this month, that was a crappy month. Or this month I made 25 grand, this was a good month, like I think people resonate with that. So I was inspired by JLD. I did one episode and you know it's kind of funny, john. I know I'm a little all over the place, but I remember hearing Gary Vaynerchuk talk about this a few years ago.

Speaker 2:

He says document the journey, document the journey, document the journey. And at the time I thought what that means is just take a bunch of pictures of yourself and just talk about the good things that you do. That's not what he means at all. It means be real. It means basically, do a public journal and the more public you are about failures and the more stories that we're able to tell, the more people respond to it, just like you're talking to me about it. I was on a podcast yesterday with Anthony Noori Same deal. I said, mark, I love the income report. This morning I was in a team meeting. Two of the team members said, mark, I really enjoyed the income report. So I plan on leaning more into that and sharing more lessons through storytelling on the show.

Speaker 1:

Love that storytelling. I mean there's a vulnerability to sharing that and saying, man, it was a lousy month or it was a great month. I felt good about it. Even your end of year just really focused on. While it may not have been, you felt just short of hitting your target it was one of the most fulfilling years for you as a person and as a leader, and again, at 40 years old, that's a pretty good feeling.

Speaker 1:

You're touched on AI and I think there's something here as well, because that's something as I followed you. You've made a shift here. You've found either a pain point or a pleasure point in the work that you do in this term called AI that you're starting to learn more about. You found a market for and things like that. Look for me as a leader. While I'm not an early adopter to pieces like that, I'm fascinated by some of those things and I think, as leaders, especially as maybe older guys like me in the leadership role there's really two responses they have to AI. There's either this fear of holy smoke what is this going to do, Okay? Or this fascination that says, boy, how can I really learn from that? It's a pain with a pleasure. What drives you? Tell me about this new infatuation you have with AI and where you're going with it.

Speaker 2:

Well, ai changes everything. A year and a half ago, just about a year and a half ago, about 14 months ago I lost a key team member, got that dreaded call that every entrepreneur gets, every business owner gets boss. I quit and this guy's like, hey, I'm moving to Spain gonna do my own thing, peace. And I was like crap. And I did the next thing that business owners do I put out a job listing, trying to find someone, and I just started doing the work because it's gotta be done. I immediately became overwhelmed and I wasn't sleeping well. Kind of wife was noticing the relationship with people around me started suffer a bit, cause I was just, I was stressing out, spending all this time doing these tasks and then I was like there's gotta be a better way. So I started using AI in this task. In John, I immediately saved 90% of my time. I saved so much time and I was like blown away. Blown away. So I started training my other team members on what I was doing. I brought on I eventually found someone, brought them on, trained the new team member on this new AI and four months later I quit my day job, four months later. So when I saw the impact that it had on me giving peace of mind, a good night's rest, better relationship with my wife, saving up to 90% of my time on tasks I became hooked. I started looking at all the new tools. I started testing them myself. I started funding them for my team to test these new tools. I started talking to app developers. I talked to about two to five AI app developers every month and I was just blown away.

Speaker 2:

I try to share all my best kept secrets on a newsletter at aiupdateai. And because, like this is life changing stuff, john, like this is not just life changing, it's world changing, it's human changing. The World Economic Forum anticipates 80 million jobs are gonna be displaced this year. By AI McKinsey, the largest consulting group in the entire world, they're predicting 30% of the global workforce to be displaced over the next seven years. Walmart plans to automate 63% of their stores before 2027. So, like the world is changing so quickly and so rapidly, we need to be adapting this stuff from every level of every industry, from the mail clerk to the CEO. Ai is gonna impact what you do, and so I've dove headfirst deep end of the pool, not just learning it but executing on it and trying to share my best lessons, mark.

Speaker 1:

I love that and again, that's to me that will be one of those Like, I'm fascinated by it. I have to learn from it. Those leaders who are using the other word, they're on the other side of that. When they use the word fear, you know, there's things that can happen and there's the word that comes to mind when I talk with folks about it a bunch is authenticity. It's so funny talking to college students talking about I don't like it.

Speaker 1:

I had to work so hard to get to my degree and now there's this easier way to do things and I always love the challenge on, because how can it be used for good as well, you know, in the healthcare space and helping us to become healthier or more fit in terms of what we do. Or, you know, while there is the job displacement, it's the productivity, the 90% productivity improvement. Bring you up to do what you're best at. Or, in the case of healthcare, bring a physician up potentially to be the empathetic physician that they need to be with their patient rather than looking at their computer and trying to type stuff, in that they really don't need to be typing into their computer and not focusing their energy on the patient. I see the good. Others see the fear. What do you say to those folks who see the fear?

Speaker 2:

It's okay to be afraid. I'm afraid there's a lot of risk, but here's the deal. It changes everything. It can pass the bar. It can pass the medical licensing exam. It aces the SAT. It's read every book, it's watched every movie. Like this is like the most powerful tool. These are the most powerful tools in the history of humanity, like.

Speaker 2:

I'll give you another thing that I think is relevant AI is 50% more effective at finding tumorous cells on X-rays and MRIs 50%. So, john, if I'm going in for a cancer screening, am I gonna use a doctor or radiologist that's not using AI? Hell, no, because they're not as effective. I'm going to use a radiologist that has. We use AI at the very top of the banner on their website, because I know that that radiologist is going to be much more accurate and effective at finding and preventing cancer.

Speaker 2:

You cannot afford to dig your head, put your head in the sand. The good news is this is new. It's fresh. We're at the front end of this thing. Nobody knows exactly what's happening. That's why everyone's kind of talking about it and chirping about it. If you're using chat GBT daily, you're a 1% of the 1%, because it's putting you at a tremendous advantage and you might say well, mark, I don't really know exactly where it's going. Nobody does, nobody does. Not even Sam Altman, the CEO of OpenAI, knows where this thing is going. So what that means is we're moving into a phase of humanity that's going to be very chaotic, and so by finding the right lanes, by finding solutions to the chaos, you're going to position yourself for tremendous success, and that's what I'm trying to facilitate, both in myself and my team and by subscribers to the AI Update newsletter.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'll make sure to put a link into that. I would encourage everybody to sign up for that newsletter to give, by the way. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

I'll give a free gift to your subscribers. I'll give you a special link. I'll give you a 100-page guide to chat GBT. All my best secrets, my best prompts, my best follow-ups. All my best secrets to chat GBT. It's all free. Just go sign up for the newsletter. I'll give it to you for free at aiupdatea.

Speaker 1:

Hey listeners, I want to take a quick moment to share something special with you. Many of the topics and discussions we have on this podcast are areas where I provide coaching and consulting services for individuals and organizations. If you've been inspired by our conversation and are seeking a catalyst for change in your own life or within your team, I invite you to visit coachjohngallaghercom forward slash free call to sign up for a free coaching call with me. It's an opportunity for us to connect, discuss your unique challenges and explore how coaching or consulting can benefit you and your team. Okay, let's get back to the show. All right, we'll be there. I'll be the first one in line for that one for sure. Hey, mark, I want to ask is staying just on AI? There was a podcast that you did or a video you had on YouTube and you talked about the fear side of it and woke AI and what could be the worst. Tell me what is woke AI and why is that something that could be damaging as well?

Speaker 2:

So I'll try not to get political. But wokeness is this mind virus that essentially dictates that in order for someone to be successful, they had to hurt someone else, they had to do wrong to someone else to be successful. It's incredibly dangerous. It's been tried before. It's ended in piles and piles of bodies. It's not meritocratic, it's no fun. It ruins lives. This wokeness is. It's really bad.

Speaker 2:

On Monday it's going to be MLK Day and Martin Luther King. He had a dream that he would live in a world where little white boys and little black boys and little white girls and little black girls could hold hands, and in a world where they don't have to worry about this stuff. It's that kind of that colorblind idea. This is what liberalism is built on, and we've moved so far past that. We've moved so far past that Now all people see is oppressor, oppressed color. This is why people don't know if they should like. Should I be for Israel? Should I be for Palestine? And this is why you hear politicians say stuff like well, I'll only hire a black woman, lesbian. It's like. This is why airlines are getting caught up in. We're not hiring based on the best candidates, the best pilots. We're going to hire based on race, gender, sexuality. It's complete garbage. Complete garbage. It's not based on I want the best person for the job. It's I hire based on race. It's literal racism. Okay, that makes me very upset. I don't want to live in a world. I don't teach that to my kids. We don't live that way, so let me just lay that out first.

Speaker 2:

By the way, that video is an hour long and I cite tons of resources. I review tons of videos because this is a very pervasive and dangerous ideology that's infecting the world, right? So why does that matter for AI? Well, it matters because AI large language models are trained based on data. It's trained based on research papers and news articles, videos, movies and blogs. It's trained on all this data. It's trained on the information that people like you and me put into it. By the way, don't put sensitive personal information into chat GPT. Don't put industry secrets into chat GPT, because it's learning based on what you put in there. Okay, don't put your social security number into chat GPT.

Speaker 2:

So why is this dangerous? Well, if we train AI based on these bad, dangerous, frankly racist ideas, that's what it's going to learn. That's what AI is going to learn and that's what it's going to reflect back at us. It's going to give us those same terrible ideas, and where this gets dangerous is because AI is going to shape the future of the internet, it's going to shape the future of education, it's going to shape the future of healthcare. So if AI is trained on these bad ideas and it's pushing out bad ideas and those bad ideas are used to train more AI on bad ideas, what we do is we create this dangerous, dangerous, cyclical system where AI is only producing the most toxic, dangerous, anti-human ideas, and so I'm not here for it. I don't like it, and I'm glad that people are starting to wake up to how terrible these woke ideas are. Mark.

Speaker 1:

I appreciate you sharing, and again, the transparency. While it doesn't have to be a political statement, one of the things that I believe is a man of faith. As well as that, there is evil in the world and exists, and people are going to work to put evil into this process. There's no doubt about it, and so we have got to be persistent, we've got to be diligent about filtering, you know, through our own values, through our own beliefs and through our own principles. You know what is the information that's there. So not just taking everything that chat GPT, you know, spits out at us, but making sure that we have our voice inside of that activity, you know, because we want to be right Absolutely.

Speaker 2:

And speaking up. Don't be afraid to speak up. If you're at a dinner party and someone says something like I don't get down, like that, it's not, that's not the way to get down. And it doesn't mean you have to be mean, it just means you say, ah, two plus two equals four. I don't know what to tell you, you know, because this idea that there is no truth but power is very dangerous. And you know, my pastor laid this out in a really a really clear way the other day. I thought it was really good. He said truth without grace is mean, Grace without truth is meaningless, but truth with grace is medicine. I think that really encapsulate the way I feel about it. Love that.

Speaker 1:

Folks, I think you know just that 30 second rewind is worth it just to hear that last statement, because those are, those are absolutely great principle to follow with regard to grace and truth. Absolutely, mark. I appreciate you sharing all that about a. I'm going to put those links in the show notes to make sure folks get there. I'm going to shift gears just a little bit, because there's another aspect of your business that I find interesting, and so it might be learning for me as well as the listeners that go forward, and that's this concept of masterminds. So you host a mastermind. You also have participated in masterminds before. Tell me about a mastermind community and why leaders could benefit from joining a mastermind community, maybe even yours as well. Tell us about yours and how that works, because they're not accountability groups, they're not just meetups, they're they're something different. What's there for you?

Speaker 2:

Oh man, if you're not surrounding yourself with the right people, you're not achieving you're just not. You're not achieving your, your full level of excellence. My mastermind group, the after hours entrepreneur mastermind, is really focused on where. What are the success points, what are the success patterns in business? What's happening next? We talk a lot about AI, talk a lot about marketing leadership as well, but you know to your point, the world is changing so fast. The and we're going getting to such a chaotic experience Like the world has changed so fast. Like you know, bitcoin is now regulated. What does that mean for financial markets? You know AI is reading MRIs. Ai is writing books. They're. You know what is VR playing to this? You know AI influencers are here, like what happens with AI influencers. So the world is just changing so rapidly. What we really try to do is say, hey, where are the niches? What are you doing? That's working, what? This is what I did last week. That worked and it's been incredibly, incredibly powerful.

Speaker 2:

I was just on a call yesterday with Daniel Knight. Shout out to Dan Knight and all the unicorns out there and his, his unicorn community, but he was just walking me through all these steps of how he's integrating chat GPT with a spreadsheet that is full of data. So he all, the all the people he's coming into contact with, who are filling out forms, who are applying to certain programs, they're all going into the spreadsheet and the spreadsheet is is is set up in a way so that he's creating these expert prompts and he's taking those prompts and he's transferring them into chat GPT and chat GPT has taken that query and it's giving a really excellent response with which he's able to target the people. He's better to get better data. He's bet he's able to make better websites. So I mean, I could go on and on.

Speaker 2:

One of the mastermind members shared a really clever way of leveraging leveraging Google forms and sending the answers to chat GPT automatically, and using chat GPT to write blogs automatically, and they're having a virtual assistant in the Philippines, turn those blogs into SEO and there's. So there's so many cool ideas out there. So, anyway, that's a really long way of saying that. You know, being part of the mastermind community is is really important. You never want to be the smartest man in the room and I often feel that I'm not, which is that's where I want to be.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. That can be really cool and I love that Again, the concept behind surrounding yourself with the right people, people that are smarter than you as well, their idea lifters, so they're sharing ideas within that of what has worked and, frankly, what's not worked for them as well, so that should be able, inside of that group, to be able to scale and accelerate the speed in which you can turn it into success. But I love, I love the idea of that mastermind and I think folks, myself included, would benefit from just learning a little bit more about that as we go forward. I appreciate you sharing that. Okay, I can't believe how fast our time has gone. I'm going to shift it over to you and use one of your podcast points that you use and that's the idea behind what's overrated or underrated. So I'm going to give you a couple of topics. You can give me a quick response and then maybe a why in terms of what goes forward with there as we go forward, so overrated or underrated. You touch on it. Just a second virtual assistance underrated.

Speaker 2:

You definitely be using virtual assistance. You can get people that they're willing to take $10, $15 an hour. That can do awesome work, maybe even less in some cases. The key, I think, and where people are going to see immense success, is when they're leveraging AI to empower virtual assistance, because people in other countries may not write in English very well, but if they can use AI to supplement their skill, they go all of a sudden go from being a two to being a seven or eight. So virtual assistance underrated still here in 2024.

Speaker 1:

Love that and I think about that as the space. We've talked about AI, artificial intelligence, but really you just touched on something that's like augmented intelligence is what it is. It's using that product to make you, to augment your skill set, to make you better, and I think that's something that's been pretty powerful. I worked for IBM and their Watson Health Group for a little while and how they were using AI and they just it just wasn't, the marketplace wasn't ready for it yet, but they beat Jeopardy with Watson and you know that was the fun part about it, the story to talk about, but ultimately understanding that, okay, overrated or underrated morning rituals.

Speaker 2:

I would say I'm going to go with overrated. On morning rituals I think it's good to have some morning rituals, but I think you know having two, I don't know. I like changing it up. I like changing up to an extent. There's certain things they do every morning, but I think people sometimes put too much emphasis on it.

Speaker 1:

Okay, appreciate that. Just a couple of the questions, maybe not the specific one how many, how many different podcasts do you follow and maybe what's the what's the one that's been the most influence on you?

Speaker 2:

Oh gosh, I follow quite a few. I'm liking my first million Listen to that this morning. That's a good show, pat. The PBD podcast is really good for, you know, global news and business entrepreneurship. And then I just recently ran into a show that I've really, really like. It's called All In the All In podcast. It's four tech bros. They're very well established. One of the one of them. You know people you know they were involved with the early days of PayPal, early days of Facebook, very, very smart men and they they bring the heat.

Speaker 1:

I love that. Thanks for sharing those, mark, because I think it can be that we can have too many of them. But to your point, when you're surfing, you find a new one and maybe have one fall off. That's not as good, Always learning something, something new. Thanks for sharing that.

Speaker 2:

By the way, just a side note, I found those on YouTube. I found those on YouTube, all three, all three of those I found on YouTube. So YouTube, I think, is still a very powerful way to be discovered.

Speaker 1:

I think they're just scratching the surface as well on podcasting, and we're, you know, apple and Spotify maybe out there, but YouTube just can. They're all in on that. Speaking of All In, I think YouTube's going going in deep on podcasting, which is pretty cool. A last question, and well, last question in this space, in terms of fun what's the best tech investment you've made in the last year? That's under a hundred bucks.

Speaker 2:

Probably chat GPT Pro just getting access to their newest versions. No way Automations. With Zapier, they now just released the GPT market, which allows you to create your own custom AI chatbots which you can train with your own links and your own resources. It reads PDFs, it generates images, so I'd have to go with chat GPT Pro. I use it every day Very much, love it.

Speaker 1:

Excellent Thanks for sharing that, mark. I certainly appreciate the time that you've shared with the listeners of the Uncommon Leader podcast. This conversation has been fascinating. I can't wait to go back and listen to it myself. I have one more question and then I'll ask you also to share how folks can stay in touch with you, but I always ask my first time. Guess this question. At the end I'm going to give you a billboard. You can put any. I know it's low tech or whatever it is, but you can put anything you want to on that billboard for millions of people to see all the time. What's the message you put on that billboard and why?

Speaker 2:

Just be better than yesterday. That's why I try to live by. You know, I think it was Bill Gates who said we overestimate what we can do in one year. We underestimate what we can do in 10. Jordan Peterson, just clean your room. Sometimes it can be overwhelming to think about all the things that we need to do, but if I just be a little bit better than I was yesterday, it's going to compound immensely, immensely. And I just give you a quick story I had someone message me on Facebook the other day long, long, long, long, long messages.

Speaker 2:

This guy is just really struggling, just really really struggling, with all kinds of different things and I, you know lots of texts and I responded back hey, can I ask you a question Are you exercising daily? No, I hadn't exercised in months, and you know, sometimes, you know it's, it's, it's, it's. It's sometimes the simple things that happen If you just start exercising daily, whether that's lifting weights or jogging or playing tennis. Just be a little bit better than yesterday. It, it, it, it, it, it I can't really explain how much that will change your life and your perspective just being a little bit better.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, the 1% improvement right. I mean, these huge leaps are things that tend to not be sustainable for us and that's part of the thing, especially this time of year New Year's resolutions. I'm going to go to the gym six days a week and they hadn't been in six years, and you end up so sorely like that's it, I'm done, I'm going back again, kind of thing. It's that little continuous improvement as a leader, as a person, as someone in your spiritual mindset, in your mindset, in your health, all those things. That little improvement every day can be really powerful. In fact, I think there's a sign that hangs in the gym that I go to. It says I'm 1% better than yesterday, kind of thing. So I love that as a quote be better than yesterday. Mark. Again, I appreciate you sharing with the listeners. I've enjoyed the conversation. Tell them how they can be in touch with you, because they're going to want to know how to get in touch with you.

Speaker 2:

You'd find Mark Savant all over the web on your favorite platform, thanks to the power of podcasting. The power of podcasting. You're only going to find Mark Savant. There was a doctor in California but he basically doesn't exist online anymore because I'm so good at what I do with content creation. But you can find Mark Savant If you enjoyed it. You want more info? Hit me up, mark at marksfantmediacom. Email me, mark at marksfantmediacom.

Speaker 1:

Excellent, Mark, I appreciate it. I wish you the best going forward. Thanks again for your time. Thanks, john, be blessed. Well, that's all for today's episode of the Uncommon Leader Podcast. Thanks for listening in. Please take just a minute to share this podcast with that someone you know that you thought of when you heard this episode. One of the most valuable things you can do is to rate the podcast and leave a review. You can do that on Apple Podcasts or on Spotify or any other platform you listen to. Until next time, go and grow champions.

"Exploring Entrepreneurship and Finding Success"
Transparency and AI in Leadership
AI's Impact on Business and Society
Benefits of Joining a Mastermind Community
Podcast Recommendations and Tech Investments